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Dr. David Moore's Guide for Parents: Oral Safety

Dr. David Moore's Guide for Parents: Oral Safety

When it comes to your children’s oral safety and health, there are a lot of elements to consider, some of which you may not think of until a need or situation arises. Dr. David Moore has seen a variety of pediatric oral health cases in his Charlotte patients. From his experience, here are three common issues to be informed about when it comes to your child’s mouth safety.

Sports injuries in kids can be extremely harmful.

Contact Sports

The danger: Sports injuries in kids can be extremely harmful. Their bodies are constantly changing and growing so excessive force or foreign objects have the potential to cause a lot of harm. One area that some parents won’t think of protecting is their child’s mouth; however, oral injuries in youth contact sports are a growing concern among health professionals.

 

The safeguard: Visit a pediatric dentist who specializes in custom fitting youth mouth guards. Devices are sold at mass retail markets, however, those often produce a poor or improper fit. Additionally, because a child’s mouth is changing as rapidly as the rest of his body, it’s vital to ensure the fit is checked often by a professional. For these reasons, your pediatric dentist should be your first stop when your child expresses an interest in enrolling in a contact sport.

Dr. Moore also often finds that when kids are feeling under the weather, parents are more likely to forgo the toothbrush battle.

Winter Illnesses

The danger: With colder temperatures, it’s common to see kids battling more germs. When a cold or the flu strikes, parents may not be as focused on oral health and be more concerned about their child’s overall well-being. However, it’s still crucial to protect children’s teeth from excess sugar hiding in places you may not expect. Cough drops, some pediatric electrolyte drinks, juices, and even certain types of medicines may have added sugars that can damage your child’s teeth. Dr. Moore also often finds that when kids are feeling under the weather, parents are more likely to forgo the toothbrush battle.

 

The safeguard: Give your child water, low-acidic drinks, and sugar-free cough drops in place of items that may introduce extra sugar to the teeth. Instead of asking your child to brush their teeth when they feel the worst- in the morning or at night- try to get your child to brush a couple of times during the day. This will help keep any sugars from building up for too long.

A fear, or at least anxiety, of the dentist is extremely common, especially in kids.

Aversion to the Dentist

The danger: A fear, or at least anxiety, of the dentist is extremely common, especially in kids. Allowing kids to let their nerves set the tone for their oral health is something Dr. Moore sees all too often. When kids protest about dentist visits, some parents may find it’s easier to push the appointments. Sometimes the immediate battle doesn’t seem worth the payoff. But, don’t let regular checkups slide to the wayside.

 

The safeguard: Encourage a healthy relationship with a pediatric dentist (and practice) that your child can learn to enjoy. By finding a good fit for your kids and family, you will create a dental home that helps ease the fear and nerves of visits. When the dentist and hygienists work to create a playful, educational, and safe environment for kids, patients (and parents) are more likely to feel comfortable in the office- and perhaps even enjoy the visit!

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